The Best Sweet Beer Bread.

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Ok, so I know I said that last week I made the Best Beer Bread, and I still stick to that claim. However, the other day, I tried again, with a different beer this time – something just a little more dessert-like. What was the beer, you might ask? Why, it was Creme Brulee Stout, by Southern Tier Brewing Co.

a sweet, sweet beer.

a sweet, sweet beer.

The only problem here, was that the recipe as you may remember, calls for 12 oz of beer, and this bottle was, alas, 16 oz. Oh darn. The only solution was to drink the remaining 4 oz. Oh the perils of being a baker. 😉

more beer than bread.

more beer than bread.

Well, needless to say, the beer was delicious, and I was even more excited now to see how the bread would turn out! It smelled amazing, and it appeared to have been baked to perfection. Now, the hard part – waiting for it to cool, so I could try it.

hurry up.

hurry up.

Finally, the cooling hour had come. It was time. Time to slice. Time to taste. Time to judge and be judged.

worth waiting for.

worth waiting for.

Well, it was definitely worth the wait. It’s hard to say at this point which beer bread was the actual best – I think it all comes down to personal preference. This one was a little sweeter, which, anyone who knows me would know that sweeter is my bag. Not everyone digs on sweeter though, so let’s just call it a draw. This one shall be bestowed with the title of Best Sweet Bread Bread. If you’d like to try is, use the same Beer Bread Recipe as previously posted, but use the Creme Brulee Stout. Remember to only use 12 oz – and to drink the rest. Never let great beer go to waste.

I’ll have the burnt cream, please.

Everything sounds better in french. It’s just a fact. Au revoir (goodbye), petit dejeuner (breakfast), boulangerie (bakery)…heck even Je viens de vomi (I just threw-up) has a nice ring to it when spoken in the most romantic language on earth. Such it is with Crème brûlée.

Crème brûlée means “burnt cream.” We made it in class this week, and every time I mentioned to someone that we made it, their response was some form of “MMMMM…That’s my favorite dessert.” And it really is one of the best desserts around, with its rich creamy inside, and crispy top. You can’t go wrong when you order it at a restaurant – I’ve never met a Crème brûlée I didn’t like.  

But what if instead, as you were sipping your apéritif (after dinner drink) and perusing the dessert menu, listed among the likes of Sacher Torte, Napoleon, and Tart Tatin was “Burnt Cream.” Would you even consider ordering that? I bet you’d pause on it, wonder what possibly could be so great about that, and move on, while maybe even begin questioning the credibility of the establishment. But with just a quick switch to French, you’ve got yourself a Crème brûlée.

lost in translation.

So next time you’re at a restaurant, and you wonder why all the desserts are in french and you can barely pronounce them, just think of burnt cream.

Speaking of pronunciation and Crème brûlée, for some reason my mom has never been able to pronounce it properly. Instead of saying “Crem brew – LAY,” she says “Crem BREW-lee.” I bet she says it right from now on, though. 😉